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The Society of Jesus affirms Loyola’s commitment to its Jesuit, Catholic identity

| By Molly Robey
Alumni Memorial Chapel

After a year-long review process, Loyola University Maryland’s commitment to its Jesuit, Catholic identity has been affirmed by the Rev. Arturo Sosa, S.J., the Superior General of the Society of Jesus.

“This is both an accomplishment and a reminder of the importance of living out our mission,” said Rev. Brian F. Linnane, S.J., president of Loyola. “Our Jesuit, Catholic principles anchor us and inspire us to challenge ourselves constantly to improve as we strive to have a positive, transformative impact in our community and on our world.”

All Jesuit colleges and universities are required to participate in the Mission Priority Examen. Through the process, Loyola engaged in institutional reflection on the mission and established three concrete priorities for mission enhancement over the next 5-10 years: Ignatian formation, equity and inclusion, and environmental sustainability.

The Steering Committee chaired by Robert Kelly, Ph.D., vice president and special assistant to the president and Amanda Thomas, Ph.D., provost and vice president for academic affairs, was made up of faculty, administrator, and staff representatives from across the University, as well as members of Loyola’s Jesuit Community. The committee was charged with guiding the Loyola community through the Examen.

The self-study is available online.

“At a time when many present and future challenges are clear, Loyola welcomes this opportunity to name the tensions we are facing together directly, set priorities to position our Jesuit university on a path for future progression, and step forward with confidence, grace, and faith. The educational tradition the Society of Jesus introduced to the world 500 years ago is firm and yet flexible,” the report’s conclusion reads. “As we envision the University we aspire to be, we recognize that the journey that was undertaken in 1852 in two large townhouses in downtown Baltimore is—in many ways—just beginning.”

 
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